Andrea di Cione, known as Orcagna , died in Florence on or around 25 August 1368, when the Arte del Cambio (Moneychangers Guild) withdrew their commission to create a triptych dedicated to St. Matthew because of Andrea’s failing health and gave the project to his brother Jacopo di Cione .

Andrea di Cione, known as Orcagna, died in Florence on or around 25 August 1368, when the Arte del Cambio (Moneychangers Guild) withdrew their commission to create a triptych dedicated to St. Matthew because of Andrea’s failing health and gave the project to his brother Jacopo di Cione. Andrea worked as a painter, sculptor, and architect in the middle decades of the 14th century, providing altarpieces, tabernacles, and frescoes for many of Florence’s major churches including Santa Maria Novella and Orsanmichele.

Reference: G. Kreytenberg. “Cione.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. .

Further reading: Orcagna’s Tabernacle in Orsanmichele, Florence by Gert Kreytenberg (1994); Painting in the Age of Giotto: A Historical Reevaluation by Hayden Maginnis (1997).

The Expulsion of the Duke of Athens, 1343, fresco, Palazzo Vecchio, Florence

Jacopo di Cione and Andrea Orcagna, St. Matthew and Scenes from his life, 1367-8, formerly Orsanmichele, now Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

The Strozzi Altarpiece, 1354-7, Strozzi Chapel, Santa Maria Novella, Florence

Tabernacle, 1359, Orsanmichele, Florence: Birth of the VirginAnnunciationPresentation in the Temple; Dormition and Assumption of the Virgin

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